How to Write a Strong Conclusion for a Compare-Contrast Essay

How to Write a Strong Conclusion for a Compare-Contrast Essay

Understanding the Purpose of a Compare-Contrast Essay

Compare-contrast essays can help you to further develop critical thinking skills and foster your ability to analyze and make connections. In this type of essay, you are not just summarizing or describing the subjects, but rather, you are engaging in a deeper analysis of their similarities and differences. This analysis requires careful consideration and examination of the subject matter.

The Setup:

Before delving into the comparisons and contrasts, it’s important to set up your essay properly. Begin by introducing your topics and providing some background information to give your readers a sense of context. This setup should culminate in a clear and concise thesis statement that states the main argument or purpose of your essay.



Comparisons and Contrasts:

Once you have set up your essay, you can start making your comparisons and contrasts. It is essential to have a clear organizational structure in place, so your readers can easily follow your train of thought. One effective strategy is to dedicate a paragraph to each point of comparison or contrast. Within each paragraph, offer specific examples and evidence to support your analysis.

When making comparisons, focus on the similarities between the subjects. This can include analyzing shared traits, characteristics, or themes. On the other hand, when discussing contrasts, highlight the differences between the subjects. Pay attention to areas where one subject is superior or inferior to the other, and pull in examples to illustrate these distinctions.

The Importance of Comparing and Contrasting

Why Compare and Contrast?

Comparing and contrasting is important because it provides a context for understanding the similarities and differences between two or more subjects. It allows the reader to see the subjects in relation to one another, making it easier to comprehend their distinct qualities and characteristics. This strategy helps the writer to organize their thoughts and arguments, ensuring that the information is presented in a logical and coherent manner.

How to Compare and Contrast

When comparing and contrasting, it is crucial to consider both the similarities and differences between the subjects. To start, writers should brainstorm and gather as much information as possible about the subjects. This includes their attributes, features, and any other relevant factors. Once this information is collected, the writer can then create paragraphs that focus on specific comparisons and contrasts.

See also Exploring the 3 Main Themes of To Kill a Mockingbird


When comparing, it is important to clearly state what is being compared and provide examples that support the comparison. Similarly, when contrasting, the writer should identify the differences between the subjects and provide examples to illustrate the contrast. Both comparisons and contrasts should be specific and backed up with evidence.

One effective strategy for concluding a compare-contrast essay is to emphasize the significance of the similarities and differences discussed. The writer can discuss the implications of these comparisons and contrasts, and highlight why the findings are important. This not only shows the writer’s understanding of the topic, but also leaves a lasting impression on the reader.

Choosing a Clear Topic

Before you begin writing your essay, consider what you have been instructed to compare and contrast. Is it two specific subjects, such as two works of literature or two historical events? Or is it a more general directive, like “compare and contrast the benefits of living in a city versus living in the countryside”? Understanding the specific type of compare-contrast essay you are writing will help determine your topic.



Choosing a clear topic and organizing the essay in a logical and coherent manner is essential for writing a strong compare-contrast essay. By following these guidelines, you’ll be able to effectively compare and contrast two subjects within the same essay, allowing readers to see the similarities and differences.

Analyzing the Directive Essay Words

Directive essay words such as “compare,” “contrast,” and “discuss” indicate the type of comparison that the author’s thesis statement should make. For example, if the directive word is “compare,” the paper should focus on finding similarities between the two subjects being compared. On the other hand, if the directive word is “contrast,” the essay should explore the differences between the subjects. And if it says “discuss,” it means you should analyze both similarities and differences.

Defining “compare” and “contrast”

Comparing and contrasting can be done in various ways. The most common approach is to present the similarities and differences in separate paragraphs. However, depending on the assignment’s instructions and the specific theme you’re exploring, you might choose to use other organization strategies, like alternating between points of comparison or discussing one subject in relation to another.

Identifying Key Similarities and Differences

To begin, the writer should review the instructions of the assignment and brainstorm the similarities and differences between the two topics. This will help guide the writer in finding the main arguments to be compared and contrasted in the essay.

Summarizing main points

One way to summarize the main points is to paraphrase them. In other words, use different words to pull together the key arguments and findings. This will show the reader that you’ve been paying attention to the scope of the assignment and have understood the instructions on how to write a compare-contrast essay.

See also Understanding Different Types of Outlines for Writing Papers

FAQ

What is the purpose of a conclusion in a compare-contrast essay?

The purpose of a conclusion in a compare-contrast essay is to summarize the main points and arguments made in the essay and to restate the thesis statement in a new way.

How can I write a strong conclusion for a compare-contrast essay?

To write a strong conclusion for a compare-contrast essay, you can follow these steps: summarize the main points discussed in the essay, restate the thesis statement in a different way, and provide a final thought or insight on the topic.

What are some techniques to paraphrase the thesis statement in the conclusion?

There are several techniques you can use to paraphrase the thesis statement in the conclusion of a compare-contrast essay. You can change the structure of the sentence, use synonyms or different words with the same meaning, or rephrase the thesis statement in a more general or specific way.

Why is it important to paraphrase the thesis statement in the conclusion?

It is important to paraphrase the thesis statement in the conclusion of a compare-contrast essay to provide a sense of closure and to reinforce the main argument of the essay. By restating the thesis statement in a new way, you can leave a lasting impression on the reader and tie the essay together.

Can you provide an example of a strong conclusion for a compare-contrast essay?

Sure! Here’s an example: “In conclusion, the comparison between the characters of Romeo and Juliet highlights the tragic consequences of impulsive and irrational decisions. Through their shared impulsiveness, the play emphasizes the importance of rational thinking and communication in avoiding tragedy and conflict. By understanding the tragic fate of these young lovers, we can reflect on the choices we make in our own lives and strive to approach conflicts with reason and empathy.”

Alex Koliada, PhD

By Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD, is a well-known doctor. He is famous for studying aging, genetics, and other medical conditions. He works at the Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics. His scientific research has been published in the most reputable international magazines. Alex holds a BA in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Southern California, and a TEFL certification from The Boston Language Institute.